Contained Information #6

Friday 24th May, 2019

Contained Information #6

Contained Information #6, 2019, Glass, Natural pine constructed frame, Greyboard, Cement, Plaster, Polyfilla, Varnish, Gloss, Matt paint, Enamel paint

One aspect I want to include within my ‘Contained Information Series’ works is how to become more precise, and rigorous when documenting the transformed surface. I have deliberately designed a system which exaggerates my skills of perfection. This can be seen in the works due to myself capturing and then imprinting every shift and crease which has formed on the surface. I find myself scrutinizing the surface trying to make sense of what has happened once it has been taken out of the formulated system which is known as the ‘Unknown working process’. I find myself acting like a scientist where I conduct this experimental exercise, this is linked to applied scientific methods and techniques which leads to an intense investigation.

Contained Information #6 (Close up – photos)

Exaggerate can also mean – (Regard or represent as greater than is true), ( To make greater or more noticeable). Podbielski, John. (2000). Features of the dictionary, P193. Collins Pocket English Dictionary. Publishers: HarperCollins. Printed in Great Britain

Forensic can also mean – (Used in or connected with courts of law). Podbielski, John. (2000). Features of the dictionary, P221. Collins Pocket English Dictionary. Publishers: HarperCollins. Printed in Great Britain

Science can also mean – (A systematic study with links to skill, technique and knowledge). Podbielski, John. (2000). Features of the dictionary, P493. Collins Pocket English Dictionary. Publishers: HarperCollins. Printed in Great Britain

An Exaggerated Forensic Approach

The adjective forensic describes scientific methods used to investigate crimes. Although I am not trying to solve a crime, my approach to documenting involves similar characteristics which are used in forensic science, as I work with methods and techniques which helps to clarify a set of results.

I work with an invented collective examination or analysis of physical evidence, which helps to bring findings and results from a discovery.

When you describe something as ‘Forensic’ it usually means it has to do with finding evidence in order to solve a problem. A Forensic Scientist specializes in either crime scene investigations or laboratory analysis, where they record observations, take photos and collect evidence. When I think of the process I work with it certainly connects as I firstly create a process which is termed an ‘Unknown working process’ this is when I take advantage of materials and surfaces, deliberately setting up a system which acts like an arena where all the materials and surfaces collide and fight with one another. – (I could be seen as consciously provoking a battle – which could lead to devastation – Resulting in a crime). Once the Re – formed surface is taking out of the arena I start to investigate it’s new identity. (This is achieved by investigating, documenting and recording this new change, evidence is detected through the application of brightly coloured paints which marks the objects new existence).

Contained Information #6 - pic 5

Contained Information #6 (Close up – photo)

 

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Contained Information #5

Wednesday 01st May, 2019

Contained Information #5

Contained Information #5, 2019, Glass, Natural pine constructed frame, Wood pulp virgin fibre sack paper, Nylon string, Tanking slurry, Cement, Plaster, Varnish, Gloss, Matt paint, Enamel paint

This piece interlinks two subjects the first is the ‘Significant Form’ and the second is beauty. I wanted to display a correlation between both subject matters where they express their individual strengths. By connecting more than one subject or idea, the work starts to open up a conversation.

The surface becomes inspired by this act of processing – Proposing the question:

‘How has this surface come about and what is it trying to say?’ 

Contained Information #5 (Close up – photos)

Significant can also mean – (Important), (Expressing a meaning). Podbielski, John. (2000). Features of the dictionary, P512. Collins Pocket English Dictionary. Publishers: HarperCollins. Printed in Great Britain

Form can also mean – (Shape or apperance), (The mode in which something appears). Podbielski, John. (2000). Features of the dictionary, P222. Collins Pocket English Dictionary. Publishers: HarperCollins. Printed in Great Britain

So when you attach both meanings together it represents something known as the ‘Significant Form’.

The ‘Significant Form’

In the words of art writer Clive Bell (1881 -1964) The ‘Significant Form’ is a particular combination of lines and colours that stir our aesthetic emotions.

One reason why I was so keen to link the meaning of the ‘Significant Form’ to my making is because I see a comparison in the works I create. I see my works as expressions which have arrived from eclectic manifested processes, techniques, subjects and ideas. Instead of a deep rooted exact meaning the works are more about, the lines and colours drawing the viewer to the work creating an emotional sensory experience.

I also see my works as beautiful objective forms where the design impacts upon the importance of how the surface evolves. Responding to the objects design seems to satisfiy the viewers emotional imagination, meaning that any proposed theory becomes not so important.

Contained Information #5 (Close up – photos)

Beauty can also mean – (A combination of all the qualities of a thing that delights the senses and the mind). Podbielski, John. (2000). Features of the dictionary, P47. Collins Pocket English Dictionary. Publishers: HarperCollins. Printed in Great Britain 

The Beauty Seen In My Work

Everyone likes beauty and constantly searches for it within a piece of artwork. I try to give the viewer an experience of pure visual pleasure by formulating and organising colour in a very particular way, where I connect opposing colours which enables and provides the surface with a powerful visual quality.

Other Motifs of Beauty which are connected to my work Includes

  • Tying in an awkwardness and oddness of beauty – when something starts a transition of becoming something else.
  •  Expressing not the most conventional form of beauty and instead evoking suggestions of weird beauty, tragic beauty, pop beauty –  A link to the virus of beauty.
  • Beauty within the surprise of colour – Instead of combining associated colours I deliberately work with the harmony of linking opposing colours in order to gain the most beautiful visual impact to the design.
  •  Distorted Beauty – Radicalizing the beauty where a material and element becomes something new. A Re – Invention of a familiar material.
  • Beauty is less considered in art  – But I am trying to convert this thought by bringing value back to the term ‘Beauty’ – The colours used in my works are strong but have been subtlety orchestrated.  I want the colours in my work to have that ‘POP’ like feeling, where the work stands up and knocks the viewer out.

Beauty is in the eye of the Beholder