Contained Information #6

Friday 24th May, 2019

Contained Information #6

Contained Information #6, 2019, Glass, Natural pine constructed frame, Greyboard, Cement, Plaster, Polyfilla, Varnish, Gloss, Matt paint, Enamel paint

One aspect I want to include within my ‘Contained Information Series’ works is how to become more precise, and rigorous when documenting the transformed surface. I have deliberately designed a system which exaggerates my skills of perfection. This can be seen in the works due to myself capturing and then imprinting every shift and crease which has formed on the surface. I find myself scrutinizing the surface trying to make sense of what has happened once it has been taken out of the formulated system which is known as the ‘Unknown working process’. I find myself acting like a scientist where I conduct this experimental exercise, this is linked to applied scientific methods and techniques which leads to an intense investigation.

Contained Information #6 (Close up – photos)

Exaggerate can also mean – (Regard or represent as greater than is true), ( To make greater or more noticeable). Podbielski, John. (2000). Features of the dictionary, P193. Collins Pocket English Dictionary. Publishers: HarperCollins. Printed in Great Britain

Forensic can also mean – (Used in or connected with courts of law). Podbielski, John. (2000). Features of the dictionary, P221. Collins Pocket English Dictionary. Publishers: HarperCollins. Printed in Great Britain

Science can also mean – (A systematic study with links to skill, technique and knowledge). Podbielski, John. (2000). Features of the dictionary, P493. Collins Pocket English Dictionary. Publishers: HarperCollins. Printed in Great Britain

An Exaggerated Forensic Approach

The adjective forensic describes scientific methods used to investigate crimes. Although I am not trying to solve a crime, my approach to documenting involves similar characteristics which are used in forensic science, as I work with methods and techniques which helps to clarify a set of results.

I work with an invented collective examination or analysis of physical evidence, which helps to bring findings and results from a discovery.

When you describe something as ‘Forensic’ it usually means it has to do with finding evidence in order to solve a problem. A Forensic Scientist specializes in either crime scene investigations or laboratory analysis, where they record observations, take photos and collect evidence. When I think of the process I work with it certainly connects as I firstly create a process which is termed an ‘Unknown working process’ this is when I take advantage of materials and surfaces, deliberately setting up a system which acts like an arena where all the materials and surfaces collide and fight with one another. – (I could be seen as consciously provoking a battle – which could lead to devastation – Resulting in a crime). Once the Re – formed surface is taking out of the arena I start to investigate it’s new identity. (This is achieved by investigating, documenting and recording this new change, evidence is detected through the application of brightly coloured paints which marks the objects new existence).

Contained Information #6 - pic 5

Contained Information #6 (Close up – photo)

 

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Contained Information #5

Wednesday 01st May, 2019

Contained Information #5

Contained Information #5, 2019, Glass, Natural pine constructed frame, Wood pulp virgin fibre sack paper, Nylon string, Tanking slurry, Cement, Plaster, Varnish, Gloss, Matt paint, Enamel paint

This piece interlinks two subjects the first is the ‘Significant Form’ and the second is beauty. I wanted to display a correlation between both subject matters where they express their individual strengths. By connecting more than one subject or idea, the work starts to open up a conversation.

The surface becomes inspired by this act of processing – Proposing the question:

‘How has this surface come about and what is it trying to say?’ 

Contained Information #5 (Close up – photos)

Significant can also mean – (Important), (Expressing a meaning). Podbielski, John. (2000). Features of the dictionary, P512. Collins Pocket English Dictionary. Publishers: HarperCollins. Printed in Great Britain

Form can also mean – (Shape or apperance), (The mode in which something appears). Podbielski, John. (2000). Features of the dictionary, P222. Collins Pocket English Dictionary. Publishers: HarperCollins. Printed in Great Britain

So when you attach both meanings together it represents something known as the ‘Significant Form’.

The ‘Significant Form’

In the words of art writer Clive Bell (1881 -1964) The ‘Significant Form’ is a particular combination of lines and colours that stir our aesthetic emotions.

One reason why I was so keen to link the meaning of the ‘Significant Form’ to my making is because I see a comparison in the works I create. I see my works as expressions which have arrived from eclectic manifested processes, techniques, subjects and ideas. Instead of a deep rooted exact meaning the works are more about, the lines and colours drawing the viewer to the work creating an emotional sensory experience.

I also see my works as beautiful objective forms where the design impacts upon the importance of how the surface evolves. Responding to the objects design seems to satisfiy the viewers emotional imagination, meaning that any proposed theory becomes not so important.

Contained Information #5 (Close up – photos)

Beauty can also mean – (A combination of all the qualities of a thing that delights the senses and the mind). Podbielski, John. (2000). Features of the dictionary, P47. Collins Pocket English Dictionary. Publishers: HarperCollins. Printed in Great Britain 

The Beauty Seen In My Work

Everyone likes beauty and constantly searches for it within a piece of artwork. I try to give the viewer an experience of pure visual pleasure by formulating and organising colour in a very particular way, where I connect opposing colours which enables and provides the surface with a powerful visual quality.

Other Motifs of Beauty which are connected to my work Includes

  • Tying in an awkwardness and oddness of beauty – when something starts a transition of becoming something else.
  •  Expressing not the most conventional form of beauty and instead evoking suggestions of weird beauty, tragic beauty, pop beauty –  A link to the virus of beauty.
  • Beauty within the surprise of colour – Instead of combining associated colours I deliberately work with the harmony of linking opposing colours in order to gain the most beautiful visual impact to the design.
  •  Distorted Beauty – Radicalizing the beauty where a material and element becomes something new. A Re – Invention of a familiar material.
  • Beauty is less considered in art  – But I am trying to convert this thought by bringing value back to the term ‘Beauty’ – The colours used in my works are strong but have been subtlety orchestrated.  I want the colours in my work to have that ‘POP’ like feeling, where the work stands up and knocks the viewer out.

Beauty is in the eye of the Beholder

 

FLUX Exhibition – At The National Army Museum, Chelsea, London. Thursday 14th March – Sunday 17th March 2019

Monday 18th March, 2019 

FLUX Exhibition - March 2019 - pic 1.jpg

                               Installation photo of my works on show at FLUX Exhibition                                 (Private View opening – (Thursday 14th March, 2019)  

FLUX Exhibition displayed four of my Contained works (From the Contained series) for the first time. I was really excited to see them presented together as I had not yet seen this. What was most intriguing about this exhibition was the not knowing of how my works were to be presented.

I delivered the works to the museum on Tuesday 12th March, 2019, and would then not see them until the exhibition opened on Thursday 14th March 2019.  Founder of FLUX Lisa Gray and her curatorial team decided on the positioning of every work which featured in the show. I have mentioned before in previous posts about the necessity to include factors of chance, risk taking and the not knowing in the making of my works, so finding myself on a daily basis consumed by never ending possibilities made this requirement easy to accept.

Other subjects which coincide with my practice are Form and Order and the Anti-Form and Chaos. In the process of my making I design systems and operations which are linked to game playing . I work and live within the moment and relish the discovery of surprise, so I was wondering what avenue Lisa and her team, would take when displaying my work. Would it be presented in a straight uniformed layout, representing Form and Order in numerical chronological order for example – Contained Information #1, #2 and #3 or would the work be seen as more disorganized where each piece is scattered across the wall describing the Anti – Form and elements of Chaos, with no numerical sequence for example – Contained Information #1, #3 and #2 .

The Chosen Presentation Went:

Contained Information #3 – Contained Information #1 – Contained Information #2

FLUX Exhibition - March 2019 - pic 4.JPG

Contained Information #3, 2018, Glass, Natural pine constructed frame, Plastic, Canvas, Paulin, Nylon string, Oil pastels, Charcoal, Tanking slurry, Cement, Plaster, PVA admix adhesive, Matt paint, Enamel paint

FLUX Exhibition - March 2019 - pic 3.JPG

Contained Information #1, 2018, Glass, Natural pine constructed frame, Canvas, Oil paint, Cement, PVA admix adhesive, Matt paint, Enamel paint

FLUX Exhibition - March 2019 - pic 2.JPG

Contained Information #2, 2018, Glass, Natural pine constructed frame, Paulin, Tanking slurry, Plaster, Stain varnish, PVA admix adhesive, Matt paint, Enamel paint

FLUX Exhibition (Mini Masterpiece Wall)

FLUX Exhibition - March 2019 - pic 5.JPG

Contained Information #4, 2019, Glass, Natural pine constructed frame, Canvas, Acrylic, Dirt, Cement, Plaster, Cuprinol, Varnish, Gloss, Matt paint, Enamel paint                         (Presented on the Mini Masterpiece Wall)

Although the Mini Masterpieces were exhibited in the National Army Museum in conjunction with FLUX Exhibition, it felt like the wall was separate and away from the exhibition, almost as if the wall was hosting its own show. The aim was to feature unique smaller artworks which could be purchased at a cheaper cost, opposed to the artworks which were featured in the main exhibition.

All artists were given the opportunity to display a work and participate in the Mini Masterpiece Wall, it was an offer I accepted straight away as not only did it give me another option of presenting an extra artwork, it gave me a further chance to experiment with this continuous series.

FLUX EXHIBITION

(Private View Opening – Thursday 14th March 2019)

Contained Information #4

Friday 08th March, 2019

Contained Information #4

Contained Information #4, 2019, Glass, Natural pine constructed frame, Canvas, Acrylic, Dirt, Cement, Plaster, Cuprinol, Varnish, Gloss, Matt paint, Enamel paint

In my practice I like to challenge myself when making my works, whether this is collaborating with dissimilar materials or provoking an impact between space and colour. One area I had not explored was a drastic change in scale.  

Scale can also mean – (A reference in making measurements), (Ratio of size between a thing and a representation of it). – Podbielski, John. (2000). Features of the dictionary, P491. Collins Pocket English Dictionary. Publishers: HarperCollins. Printed in Great Britain

Contained Information #4 is the first Contained piece which represents the smallest sized work within this series. I wanted to reduce the scale because I was interested in testing my working methods, techniques and processes.

  •  Questions I asked myself which I wanted to explore were: –

Do objects which are smaller in size warrant more protection and care?

Do smaller scaled objects gain more appreciation? 

Would the audience, viewer, buyer, owner, prefer the craftsmanship in a work which has been constructed on a smaller scale, opposed to a work which is larger in scale? 

 

 

Contained Information #4 (Close up – photos)

 

 

 

Remnants from Ewhurst, Surrey

Friday 01st March, 2019

Thursday 28th February, 2019 marked the opening of my solo show – Remnants from Ewhurst, Surrey.

The show will be open:

Monday – Friday – 9am – 10pm

Saturday and Sunday – 10am – 6pm 

The last day of the show is on Tuesday 19th March, 2019

 

Photos which show the Private View evening at The Old Diorama Arts Centre Gallery (Thursday 28th February, 2019)

On the 7th January, 2019 I started a two month artist in residency at The Old Diorama Arts Centre, which led to a solo show featuring all works which I constructed within the time I was there. It was the most fantastic experience where I learnt a lot about myself as an artist, as I was confronted with new challenges leading to unexpected evolutions within my work.

This post will provide information of the research and writings I was looking at, which advanced to new concepts, techniques and process which I infused within my work.  

Old Diorama - Solo show - Pic 3

Remnant #1, (From the Remnants from Ewhurst series) – 2019 – 36 x 36 x 53.3 cm – Treated sawn wood constructed frame, Low density polyethylene plastic, Cement, Dirt, Brown paper, Varnish, Clear gloss, Acrylic paint

Why Remnants? Where did this word / idea come from, and how would this link in with this series of works?

Remnant – (Small piece), (Left over) (A surviving trace). – Podbielski, John. (2000). Features of the dictionary, P468. Collins Pocket English Dictionary. Publishers: HarperCollins. Printed in Great Britain

On Wednesday 12th September, 2018 I started a building job consisting of laying two large foundation bases. I was supporting my Dad on a job in Ewhurst, Surrey. It was a mammoth job which would span over a time period of four weeks. I don’t know how many bags of cement, sharp sand, building sand, ballast we must of gone through and I would not want to put a number to it, but what caught my attention was the amount of excess packaging left on site. I said to my Dad, “What do you plan on doing with the packaging”, his reply was “I guess we will have to skip it”. This instantly struck a chord with me I thought this can not happen, firstly I was thinking where on earth will it all go, Landfill? and secondly I was thinking how can I infuse this into my art practice, how can I keep the packaging and how can I give it a purpose, and a value which it once had. Surely it is not all about the contents inside, sure the cement is important but what about the packaging, it went through a meticulous process in order to arrive as we know it. I was interested in refiguring the products look, how can I make this product exciting and appealing but through a new context. How could this become an interesting and thought provoking work of art?

Initial Themes I started to look at

  • Recycling
  • Materialization, Transforming, Converting
  • Process & Technique
  • Preserving
  • Making something out of nothing
  • Re – Introducing
  • The past – The present – The future
  • Time lapses & Time restraints
  • Transforming for the better not the worse
  • A contrasting effect between decay and beauty
  • Non – Importance becoming Important
  •  Deconstructing – Constructing
  • Sub – conscious thinking
  • The familiar becoming the Unfamiliar
  • Order vs Chaos
  • Colour impact
  • Form vs Anti – Form

 

LeftRemnant #2, (From the Remnants from Ewhurst series) – 2019 – 33 x 26.5 cm – Natural pine constructed frame, Low density polyethylene plastic, Sharp sand, Dirt, Varnish, Clear gloss, Acrylic paint

Right – Remnant #3, (From the Remnants from Ewhurst series) – 2019 – 28 x 35.7 cm – Natural pine constructed frame, Low density polyethylene plastic, Shingle sand, Dirt, Varnish, Clear gloss, Acrylic paint

Bottom – Remnant #4, (From the Remnants from Ewhurst series) – 2019 – 32.5 x 31.5 cm – Natural pine constructed frame, Low density polyethylene plastic, White parish building sand, Dirt, Varnish, Clear gloss, Acrylic paint

Themes I took a real focus on for this series of works

Form vs The Anti – Form

We often carry around with us a mental rectangle where we can drop it around whatever we are doing. It is this which makes us feel at home, at ease and with a sense of control. 

Form

  • Arrangement = A wholeness which = A total configuration (A process of evolution)

 

Anti – Form

  • How to get rid of the rectangle = How to live by chaos – A feeling of recklessness = Living by chance (Living for the moment)

 

A good reason why we are all squares (Forms) is because we find it easier to read subjects through squares. For example: A rectangular magazine – A publication – A photograph.  Reading in this way seems to make sense to us, as our movements become more familiar because we live in a world dominated by the straight edge.

I like to play with the idea of combing the straight edge with the crooked edge.

I have had enough of the politeness in things! What excites me is seeing the chaos evolve from underneath, where it takes you out of a controlled state and puts you in a situation of the unexpected!  

It is the Anti – Form which abstracts the meaning of form.

I set myself an objective to work with an object which was originally whole and formal. This object then collapses and breaks down, where the straight edge starts to disappear. I then wanted to make this object full and perfect again, but built through operations and new systems.

I wanted to work with materials and surfaces which had differences, whether they were fragile, soft, robust or hard. All installed within irregular properties. I wanted to investigate this meaning of irregularity, by understanding the constructed patterns which proposed a sense of knowing.

  • I amplified the many possibilities which were made.
  • But could the Anti – Form actually mean Anti geometry?

Other Conclusions made between The Form vs The Anti Form  

  • The stable vs the Unstable
  • The open vs The Closed
  • The Regular vs The organic
  • The Real vs The ideal

 

 

Left – Remnant #5, (From the Remnants from Ewhurst series) – 2019 – 64 x 64 x 88 cm – Treated sawn wood constructed frame, Low density polyethylene plastic, Cement, Sharp sand, Dirt, Varnish, Clear gloss, Acrylic paint

Right – Remnant #7, (From the Remnants from Ewhurst series) – 2019 – 43.5 x 62.1 cm – Natural pine constructed frame, Low density polyethylene plastic, Cement, Shingle sand, Dirt, Brown paper, Varnish, Clear gloss, Acrylic paint

Principles of Colour

Focusing on the contrasting values in colour allows us to enhance our visual capacity of looking!

Contrasting Colours

  • Draws our attention to a particular object.

Remnants #2, #3, #4, #6 and #7 illustrates maximum hue contrast in the colours value. The works draws instant attention because the surface has a contrasting value which is more settled.

However Hue contrasts in colour can be easily overused which can create visual clutter. I deliberately used this in Remnants #1, #5 and #8, I wanted to visually describe the chaotic approach used within my practice, and in particular this series of works.

In the show the works have real dynamism because they are not settled, the surface is not settled, meaning the media is not settled, meaning the space becomes unsettled.

Colour Design

I worked with three dimensions of colour:

  • Hue – The colours name – For example: Red, Yellow, Blue
  • Value – The lightness or darkness in the colour
  • Chroma – Describes the colourfulness how vivid it is.

I wanted to created maximum colour impact so I deliberately worked with the paint straight from the tube, in order to get the colours true pigment and correct chroma.

 

Left – Remnant #6, (From the Remnants from Ewhurst series) – 2019 – 43.4 x 61 cm – Natural pine constructed frame, Low density polyethylene plastic, Shingle sand, White parish building sand, Dirt, Varnish, Clear gloss, Acrylic paint

Right – Remnant #8, (From the Remnants from Ewhurst series) – 2019 – 43.5 x 62.1 cm – Treated sawn wood constructed frame, Low density polyethylene plastic, Cement, Shingle sand, White parish building sand, Dirt, Varnish, Clear gloss, Acrylic paint

 

Space

I was keen to transform the architectural shape of the gallery. I wanted to create a spatial environment. 

  • Spatial meaning – A relation to the space we are in, and a relation to the positioning of objects in space.
  • Spatial Area – Relating to the occupying of space – Testing the capacity of space.
  • Spatial Form – The physicality of an object or the materials situated in a given space.
  • Spatial Relationship –  How an object is located in space.

I wanted to insert all spatial areas within the show. To do this I purposely worked with formal formats and Anti – Form formats. What I mean by this is:

  1. Positioning my work in a traditional uniformed space                             VS
  2. Positioning my work in challenging, transformative suggestion of space, where human relations could become complicated, meaning viewers start to question their exact relation to the space they are in.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Talking Point – ‘A WatWei Show’

Tuesday 12th February, 2019

A fascinating experience into the digitalised world of art

Talking Point Show - pic 2

Venue for the showLethaby Gallery, 1 Granary Square, Kings Cross, London N1C 4AA

Curators of the show – Rory Watson & Tyler Prior

 

Is the Digital impacting on the Artworld?

Watson and Prior also known as WatWei – Their objective was to kick start a conversation about how art is seen today.

My phone and The Talking Point WatWei programme – were the only tools used to navigate myself around the gallery

Throughout the show many questions were raised which sparked an interesting debate about the curatorial purposes, and what is now meant by the meaning of art. Below lists some of these fascinating thoughts:

  • Is the work on show still my work / the artists work / or does the work now belong to someone else?

 

  • Does the gallery loose part of its meaning?

 

  • An amazing experience – Being able to show your work in a gallery without the hassle of any installment.

 

  • A strong trust between artist and curator emerges, as the artist gives 100% control to the curator, as they decided how the work was to be seen.

Talking Point Show - pic 11.JPG
What was most unusual was seeing many people walking around a gallery with their phone right up to their faces. A scene you would expect to see in a busy town or city , but in a gallery?

  • I always felt viewing art in a gallery gave you the chance to have a personal moment. Where you could have that real time of corresponding with the works. This show changed it for me as I was experiencing the show with 20 to 30 other people, all close together hovering over each others phone trying to make sense of what was on the screen.

The strongest question I kept asking myself was – What really is a gallery? – Could it be the same as – what is an artists studio? 

  • An artists studio does not have to be an elaborate huge space, instead it could be a dinning room, a bedroom, a garden. As long as that space gives you access and allows you to get the job done, it is deemed the perfect space.

Could this be the same for the gallery?

  • I believe that in time there will be more and more art shows taking place in houses, shops, carparks, public transport and phones, opposed to well lit clean and tidy white cubed spaces.

Art just needs an audience and space!  

So why did I apply for this show?

I was keen to challenge myself and my work. I wanted to come away from the usual clean white cubed space where my work is often displayed.  My works are sculptural paintings where the 3 Dimensional is crucial, it is important that this is seen because it enables the audience to see the materialization between artist and material and technique and process.

I wanted to see if the phone / the digital could capture the essence of my making and do justice for my work. There were no guidelines about the show or what to expect, this did not make me nervous instead it filled me with excitement. I have always played with aspects of chance and the unknown so I was looking forward to seeing what the show had in store for me.

Talking Point Show - pic 7.JPG

Remnant #3 (From the Remnants of Ewhurst series) displayed in the exhibition.

What were my final thoughts on the show, and did I feel my work fitted in with the context of the show?

The idea of viewing art on your phone is great! More and more often apps like Instagram allow you to view artworks which you might never get to see in person. It also gives the artist a chance for their work to be seen by a large audience.

It was a brilliant experience and one I would do again but probably not displaying my own works. I realised that my work needs to be seen in person in the flesh, where the audience can really get inside the work, getting to see the process, and the obsessive nature of documentation which is imprinted into the surface.

Art professor Cynthia Freeland wrote an intriguing piece of text on Digitizing and Disseminating art

Freeland, Cynthia. (2001). A Democracy of images, P177 – 178. But is it art?. Publishers: Oxford University Press. Printed in New York

Everyone knows what the Mona Lisa and Michelangelo’s David look like – or do we? Artworks become reproduced so often we may feel we know them even if we have never been to Paris or Florence.

Art reproductions are ubiquitous!

We can now sit in our pyjamas while enjoying virtual tours of galleries and museums. around the world.

It is not just visual art that has been made more widely accessible by new technologies of reproduction. Operas, plays, and ballet performances are regularly broadcast on TV, leaving the concert symphony halls vacant.

Human experiences of art have been significantly changed in this postmodern age of the internet, videos, CDs, advertising, postcards, and posters. But for good or ill?

 

 

Contained Information #3

Friday 07th December, 2018

Contained Information #3

Contained Information #3, 2018, Glass, Natural pine constructed frame, Plastic, Canvas, Paulin, Nylon string, Oil pastels, Charcoal, Tanking slurry, Cement, Plaster, PVA admix adhesive, Matt paint, Enamel paint

An occurring thought which kept coming up during the making of these contained works was, when can or does something become valued, and appreciated . 

Value can also mean – (Importance and Usefulness), (Worth and Satisfaction). – Podbielski, John. (2000). Features of the dictionary, P602 – 603. Collins Pocket English Dictionary. Publishers: HarperCollins. Printed in Great Britain

 Appreciation can also mean – (Valued Highly), (Regarded as high notice). – Podbielski, John. (2000). Features of the dictionary, P24 – 25. Collins Pocket English Dictionary. Publishers: HarperCollins. Printed in Great Britain 

Why have I chosen to attach these words with this series of works?

  1. In my works I work with both building materials and art supplies which carry their own importance. For example:
  •  When working with building materials like cement and plaster in the building trade they are regarded as high important quality materials. Without the appliance of these materials jobs would not be fulfilled. Building a wall, patio or house would not be possible, they act as the foundation the support. Maybe without consciously thinking, we are constantly engrossed by these amazing materials. I believe that they deserve to be recognized and given a platform where they can be celebrated and appreciated.

 

  • I feel that if I was to contain just the cement or plaster in its rawest form it still would not get appreciated. So this is when art supplies become important in my work, I introduce materials like Canvas, Charcoal, Oil pastels, Acrylic and Enamel gloss paint in order to help raise the profile of the building materials. From first hand evidence the audience would firstly recognize the bright impact from the paint, but then on close inspection Cement, Plaster, Building sand then becomes visually engaging and intriguing.

A journey which presents materials of a robust and masculine nature, conversing with materials which inherit fragile and beautiful features. 

 

  • I deliberately chose to encase these works within glass frames because I wanted to showcase and enhance this idea of worth. The minute I started to contain these works in the glass frames they immediately took on value, and were noticed straight away. What made me laugh was thinking of the building materials in their past life (on the building site), where they are treated with no care, just used in order to get the job done. In my work I caress both the building materials and art supplies together, I take time to observe the beauty.

I enjoy making the familiar become the unfamiliar

 

Contained Information #3 (Close up – photos)

Contained Information #2

Thursday 01st November, 2018

 

Contained Information #2 - pic 1

Contained Information #2, 2018, Glass, Natural pine constructed frame, Paulin, Tanking slurry, Plaster, Stain varnish, PVA admix adhesive, Matt paint, Enamel paint 

During the making of this work I was focused on the theme of processing. What it means to process, and what happens to the subject when it is put through a rigours formula.

Process can also mean – (A  series of actions or changes), (A method of doing  for producing something) (To handle or prepare something by using special methods in order to manufacture). – Podbielski, John. (2000). Features of the dictionary, P437. Collins Pocket English Dictionary. Publishers: HarperCollins. Printed in Great Britain

What does process mean in art terms? 

Process art

  • The term process art refers to where the process of its making art is not hidden but remains a prominent aspect of the completed work, so that a part or even the whole of its subject is the making of the work.

 

  • Process became a widespread preoccupation of artists in the late 1960s and the 1970s, but like so much else can be tracked back to the abstract expressionist paintings of Jackson Pollock. In these the successive layers of dripped and poured paint can be identified and the actions of the artist in making the work can be to some extent reconstructed.

 

  • In process art too there is an emphasis on the results on particular materials of carrying out the process determined by the artist.

https://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/p/process-art

 

By researching into the term process from the dictionary and from an established art site, I wanted to find out, firstly whether or not the two given descriptions hold any similarity, and then secondly whether or not my work shows any connection to the two descriptions, giving my work the right to be deemed process art.

  •  For me both the dictionary and art site descriptions hold a connection and a similarity. Both describe about a progression within the material or materials used, and this action used to construct and make. The inventor/ constructor or in my case the artist has the job to select and compose, carried out by creating methods and disciplines. This then enables the subject to evolve and change from its original state.

This made me think about the instructions I compose in my work.

What do I actually do in order to create and produce, and what relationship do I hold with the materials I use.

My work explores the relationship between artist and material where I transform readymade, pre used objects into new painted sculptural artworks. I convert found objects by using a process of unravelling, where new beginnings are created from art and building materials. 

The term I use is not just process but something called an ‘Unknown Process’, this is because my labour and work deals with unpredictable and chance happenings, by combining art making with construction work.

Functioning in this format instills an approach to making, which is playful and exciting, as I constantly wrestle with materials and elements. Pushing and pulling techniques are used in order to create a tactile bond between me and the work.

Systems and operations are put into place to give guidance to my making. Information is imprinted to the reformed surface of materials by devised algorithms, and understanding and knowledge is established to what has occurred.

 

Contained Information #2 (Close up – photos)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contained Information #1

Friday 5th October, 2018

Contained Information #1 - pic 2

Contained Information #1, 2018, Glass, Natural pine constructed frame, Canvas, Oil paint, Cement, PVA admix adhesive, Matt paint, Enamel paint

This work is the first from a series which highlights upon the themes of collaborating, processing and value.  

What does collaborate actually mean? Work with another on a project or to cooperate with an enemy invader.  – Podbielski, John. (2000). Features of the dictionary, P106. Collins Pocket English Dictionary. Publishers: HarperCollins. Printed in Great Britain 

What does collaborate mean in terms of art?  Collaboration is another word for teamwork. It is an art of merging two or more creative minds together. Collaboration is more than getting together to fuse your creative energy into a large piece of work, it is more about getting it right, whether this is the scale, colour or active description of the work. – http://artbistro.monster.com/benefits/articles/12120-the-art-of-good-collaboration

So how does collaborating or collaboration feature in this body of work?

  • First and full most all of my artworks are primary, they have solely been made by me and just me. This is very important because I want to be able to say ‘I made that, all me, without any help.’ All energies consumed within the surface are pure as they come from just one source, where no other connective interaction is made, where no possible disputes are made from other sectors.

So if I don’t team up with other artists during the creations of my work, how is collaboration infused? 

  •  Teamwork in this project is made up of the surface, materials, supplies and elements interacting together. It is this which formulates the idea of collaboration, informing the idea of collaboration through a new guise. For me this example of collaborating is spontaneous, where instructions are loose and ideas constantly shift and evolve through different avenues.

 

  • I am aiming to construct a whole new meaning to the word collaborate, or another way of displaying collaboration through a visual interpretation.

 

  • Art supplies and Building materials are purposely put together. Constantly setting up my own collaborative experiment, where nothing is concrete until the process has been followed through to its logical conclusion. It is not until then when I know if the two have built a relationship of harmony or a relationship of disgust. Either way I store it, frame it and then contain it.

 

  • Normally I see collaboration as a means of connecting and gaining some kind of support, in order to get the job done. However in my work I am imposing the opposite, where I only give myself the right to perform and where a connection of all involved could become a temporary approach to collaborating . I see it as a game of intriguing value, firstly for me as the artist and then the audience.

 

Is it right for me to put art supplies and building materials together? 

 

It is this question which keeps me inspired to produce and create.

It is this question which ignites passion and installs in me a means to carry on and find out.

 

 

Contained Information #1  (Close up – photos)

 

MA Degree Show – 2018

Sunday 02nd September, 2018

Saturday 01st September, 2018 marked the end of what has been a most enjoyable and fantastic 2 years!

 

                      Photos which show the Private View evening at Farnham UCA                      (Thursday 30th August, 2018)

A CONNECTED ACTIVITY BETWEEN A HABITUAL ENVIRONMENT AND A PARTICIPATORY EVENT

An interesting aspect I connected to this event, was the composed configuration between the formal architectural structures (The building / space / area), colliding with the anti – formal (The 3 works on show), propelling against active participation (The audience).

It was this suggestion of viewer participation which intrigued me most. I was interested to find out what role the viewer had when it came to engaging with my works.

  • The most important themes I try to ingrain into the curating of my works are Experience, Meaning, Origin and Ephemeral nature. If the viewer goes away from my works and can still remember a key component the following day, week, month or year, than I can feel happy and positive that all has been achieved and complemented one another.

 

  • During the Degree show I kept on thinking how much the viewer became an integral part of the work. From the moment of experiencing the work for the first time, too informing an understanding of how best to navigate around space.

 

  • I definitely felt that the viewer became an active part of the art. By creating an environment which carried installation qualities, it allowed and invited the audience into the work where they could then start to process then own energy. This was achieved deliberately where movement had to materialize, but also this hidden energy where a very personal moment is calculated between viewer and work – ( Where a theoretical understanding starts to evolve).